Medical Center Library

Projects Archive

Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Arcadia Fund of London, 2013-2014.

The first pedagogical tool to be developed by the Digital Humanities, VHMML was commissioned by the Hill Monastic Museum and Library (HMML), whose teaching staff wanted to create an interactive set of lessons around Latin paleography, including content creation modules lessons, and assignments in the study of script, codicology, and transcription. The goal was to support both new and advanced users of manuscripts by providing a rich online environment for manuscript studies in a variety of languages. Lesson content is being generated to support HMML's summer workshop of the Minnesota Manuscript Research Laboratory. You can follow the activities of HMML on their blog.

Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, 2008-2010.

The Electronic Norman Anonymous (ENAP) is a critical edition of a single manuscript text, Cambridge, Corpus Christi College MS 415. The manuscript, which was made at Rouen in the late eleventh or early twelfth century, consists of a number of tracts which have as their broad theme the relationship between spiritual and temporal power.



Francis and Clare of Assisi: Early Documents

2009

The online version of Francis and Clare of Assisi: Early Documents is managed by the Commission on the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition and continues to be of service to those interested in the Franciscan Tradition, as well as medieval theology and church history. This project stands as the official, searchable text and translation of the first volume of Francis of Assisi: Early Documents and Clare of Assisi: Early Documents.

2008

Applying the same building scanning and gaming technologies as the Virtual Basilica (below) to the York Minster, one of the largest Gothic cathedrals of Europe, Digital Humanities created a detailed historic snapshot of the chapels and windows of great interest to scholars, but increasingly unavailable in situ because of damage and restoration.

2007

The Virtual Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi is a collaboration between the Institute of Digital Theology and Saint Louis University.

The first 3D building scan for which the Center was commissioned used the A6 game engine and laser scanning to create an interactive environment with interpretive text attached to frescoes, windows, and other features within the upper church of the Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi. This project was previously made available as a CD-ROM to through the Basilica gift shop.

Funding provided by the British Academy (1999-2000) and Saint Louis University (2003-2004); released 2005.

The Electronic Grosseteste is a website dedicated to providing electronic access to the Latin works of Robert Grosseteste (ca. 1170-1253). Materials relating to Grosseteste's life and the thirteenth century may also be found there. This early project still stands as the primary electronic resource for searchable texts and research tools surrounding the writings of Robert Grosseteste (ca. 1170-1253). The Electronic Grosseteste pioneered the global access of medieval Latin texts, encouraging real research at a distance.

Commissioned and maintained by the Commission on the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition; released 30 April 2009.

An early project of the Saint Louis University Center for Digital Theology was Francis and Clare of Assisi: Early Documents, which provided electronic access to primary texts concerning St. Francis of Assisi and St. Clare of Assis. The online version of Francis and Clare of Assisi: Early Documents is managed by the Commission on the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition and continues to be of service to those interested in the Franciscan Tradition, as well as medieval theology and church history. For Production Staff and Acknowledgements, please see the FA:ED website.